Custom Search



Serbia Stamps

Definitives of 1869-1890

The definitive Serbia stamps of 1869 to 1890 bear witness to Serbia's evolution from an independent principality to a kingdom!

During 1867, the principality of Serbia expelled the last remaining Ottoman troops from their territory, and they declared their independence from the Ottoman Empire.  By the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, the international community formally recognized the independence of the Principality of Serbia.  With political support from the Austrian Empire, the Principality of Serbia was declared a kingdom on March 6, 1882, and Prince Milan IV Obrenović was proclaimed King Milan I of Serbia.



The nine definitive Serbia stamps shown above were issued between 1869 and 1878.  The stamps are perforated 9 1/2, 12, and compound.

There were multiple printings of these new stamps, with the main difference being the spacing between the impressions on the plates.  Please see the specialized catalogs for details.

The common design of these definitive stamps features the left-facing portrait of the very young Prince Milan IV Obrenović, fourteen years old at the time these stamps were first issued.

The catalog attributes are as follows:

  • 01 P.  (1869 - Sc. #16) - Yellow.
  • 10 P.  (1869 - Sc. #17) - Red Brown, Yellow Brown.
  • 10 P.  (1878 - Sc. #18) - Orange.
  • 15 P.  (1869 - Sc. #19) - Orange.
  • 20 P.  (1869 - Sc. #20) - Gray Blue, Ultramarine.
  • 25 P.  (1869 - Sc. #21) - Rose.
  • 35 P.  (1869 - Sc. #22) - Light Green.
  • 40 P.  (1869 - Sc. #23) - Violet.
  • 50 P.  (1869 - Sc. #24) - Blue Green.



The two definitive Serbia stamps shown above were issued between 1872 and 1879.  The stamps are imperforate.

The catalog details are as follows:

  • 01 P.  (1872 - Sc. #25) - Yellow.
  • 02 P.  (1873 - Thick Paper - Sc. #26a) - Black.
  • 02 P.  (1879 - Thin Paper - Sc. #26) - Black.



The six definitive Serbia stamps shown above were issued in 1880.  The stamps are perforated 13 x 13 1/2.

The common design of these definitive stamps features an older portrait of Prince Milan IV Obrenović, twenty-six years old at the time these stamps were first issued.  Two years into the life of this new definitive series, the prince would become King Milan I.

The catalog attributes are as follows:

  • 05 P.  (1880 - Sc. #27) - Green, Olive Green.
  • 10 P.  (1880 - Sc. #28) - Rose.
  • 20 P.  (1880 - Sc. #29) - Orange, Yellow.
  • 25 P.  (1880 - Sc. #30) - Ultramarine, Blue.
  • 50 P.  (1880 - Sc. #31) - Brown, Brown Violet.
  • 01 D.  (1880 - Sc. #32) - Violet.



The seven definitive Serbia stamps shown above were issued in 1890.  The stamps are perforated 13 x 13 1/2.

The common design of these definitive stamps features a portrait of King Alexander I, twelve years old at the time these stamps were first issued.

The catalog attributes are as follows:

  • 05 P.  (1890 - Sc. #33) - Green.
  • 10 P.  (1890 - Sc. #34) - Rose Red.
  • 15 P.  (1890 - Sc. #35) - Red Violet.
  • 20 P.  (1890 - Sc. #36) - Orange.
  • 25 P.  (1890 - Sc. #37) - Blue.
  • 50 P.  (1890 - Sc. #38) - Brown.
  • 01 D.  (1890 - Sc. #39) - Dull Lilac.





eBay Auction and Store Links
Serbia

The following link features category-focused affiliated seller listings on the US eBay site. They may enable visitors to shop for and to buy specific items for the particular collecting subject they've just read about. 

The affiliated eBay seller auction lots provided by eBay, Inc. are not the responsibility of the management of this website.  On high priced material, make sure the lots you are buying are properly authenticated or certified.


 



Return to Serbia Stamps from
Definitives of 1869-1890






SBI!








Prince Milan IV Obrenović
King Milan I


Milan IV
Obrenović (1854-1901) was the Prince of Serbia from 1868 to 1882, and the King of Serbia, as Milan I, from 1882 to 1889.

The king's extravagance, coupled with his political leanings towards the Austrian monarchy, made him unpopular with his subjects.  The majority of his people, being Slavic and generally Eastern Orthodox Christians, preferred closer association with the Russian Empire.

In a move to ensure the continuation of the
Obrenović monarchy, on March 6, 1889, the king abdicated the Serbian throne in favor of his twelve year old son, Prince Alexander V  Obrenović The thirty-four year old King Milan I went into exile, initially taking up residence in Paris.  He died in exile, in Vienna, on February 11, 1901.


Queen Consort Natalija


Natalija Keschko (1859-1941), the wife of Milan IV Obrenović, was the Princess Consort of Serbia from 1875 to 1882, the Queen Consort of Serbia from 1882 to 1889.

A regency council was formed to rule Serbia, during her son's minority.  The Queen Mother was only allowed to enter Serbia for brief visits with her son, King Alexander I.  Natalija died in exile, in Saint-Denis, France, May 8, 1941.