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Newfoundland Stamps

Issues of 1932-1937


Beginning in 1932, new definitive Newfoundland stamps were introduced, featuring both portrait and pictorial issues.  The big commemorative event of 1933 was the celebration of the 350th Anniversary of the Annexing of Newfoundland by England, and additional commemorative stamps for the Silver Jubilee of King George V were issued in 1935.


The twenty definitive postage Newfoundland stamps shown above, with the exception of the 48 C. denomination in red brown, were issued during 1932.  The 48 C. denomination in red brown was issued during 1937.

These Newfoundland stamps are engraved, perforated 13 1/2 or 14, and they are printed on paper with the Arms of Newfoundland watermark.

Their attributes are as follows:


  • 1 C.  (1932 - Scott #183) - "CODFISH - NEWFOUNDLAND CURRENCY" - Green.
  • 1 C.  (1932 - Scott #184) - "CODFISH - NEWFOUNDLAND CURRENCY" - Gray Black.
  • 2 C.  (1932 - Scott #185) - King George V - Rose.
  • 2 C.  (1932 - Scott #186) - King George V - Green.
  • 3 C.  (1932 - Scott #187) - Queen Mary
  • 4 C.  (1932 - Scott #188) - Prince of Wales (King Edward VIII) - Deep Violet.
  • 4 C.  (1932 - Scott #189) - Prince of Wales (King Edward VIII) - Rose Lake.
  • 5 C.  (1932 - Die I - Scott #190) - "CARIBOU - MONARCH OF THE WILDS" - Violet Brown (shown above).
  • 5 C.  (1932 - Die I - Scott #191a) - "CARIBOU - MONARCH OF THE WILDS" - Deep Violet (not shown).
  • 5 C.  (1932 - Die II - Scott #191) - "CARIBOU - MONARCH OF THE WILDS" - - Deep Violet (shown above).
  • 6 C.  (1932 - Scott #192) - Princess Elizabeth (Queen Elizabeth II)
  • 7 C.  (1932 - Scott #208) - Duchess of York (Queen Consort Elizabeth)
  • 8 C.  (1932 - Scott #209) - "CORNER BROOK PAPER MILLS"
  • 10 C.  (1932 - Scott #193) - "SALMON - KING OF THE RIVERS"
  • 14 C.  (1932 - Scott #194) - "NEWFOUNDLAND DOG"
  • 15 C.  (1932 - Scott #195) - "NORTHERN SEAL - BABY WHITECOAT"
  • 20 C.  (1932 - Scott #196) - "TRANSATLANTIC BEACON"
  • 24 C.  (1932 - Scott #210) - "LOADING IRON ORE BELL ISLAND"
  • 25 C.  (1932 - Scott #197) - "SEALING FLEET OFF FOR THE HUNT"
  • 30 C.  (1932 - Scott #198) - "LEAVING FOR THE BANKS" - Ultramarine.
  • 48 C.  (1937 - Scott #199) - "LEAVING FOR THE BANKS" - Red Brown.

The 1 C., 2 C., and 3 C. denomination Newfoundland stamps were also issued in booklets, with varying perforation gauges.

There are imperforate varieties of all the Newfoundland stamps shown on this page, and as stated in previous pages, they are mostly intentional philatelic creations.

Sir Humphrey Gilbert Memorial Plaque
St. John's, Newfoundland


The fourteen commemorative Newfoundland stamps shown below were issued on August 3, 1933 to celebrate the 350th Anniversary of the Annexation of Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert on August 5, 1583.

These Newfoundland stamps are engraved, perforated 13 1/2, and they are printed on paper with the Arms of Newfoundland watermark.


  • 1 C.  (1933 - Scott #212) - Sir Humphrey Gilbert.

The design of the 1 C. denomination stamp shown above is based on an early 17th Century engraving, possibly by Simon de Passe (1595-1647) or one of his children, who were also engravers.

Sir Humphrey Gilbert (1539-1583) was an adventurer, explorer, member of parliament, soldier, and an early pioneer of the English colonial empire during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (Lived: 1533-1603, Reigned: 1558-1603).  His half brother, on his mother's side, was Sir Walter Raleigh (1554-1618).


  • 3 C.  (1933 - Scott #214) - Gilbert family Coat of Arms.


  • 2 C.  (1933 - Scott #213) - "COMPTON CASTLE" - Residence of the Gilbert family since the 14th Century.
  • 4 C.  (1933 - Scott #215) - "EATON COLLEGE" - Where Sir Humphrey Gilbert was educated.


  • 5 C.  (1933 - Scott #216) - "THE TOKEN FROM HER MAJESTY".

The token shown on this stamp was awarded to Sir Humphrey Gilbert by Queen Elizabeth I prior to his voyage of colonization.  It was delivered to him by his brother, Sir Walter Raleigh, in March 1583.  With the gift of the token, Queen Elizabeth I wished him good luck and a safe voyage.

The token was made of beaten gold, with a pearl at the top.  It was so treasured by Sir Humphrey Gilbert that he wore it on his breast for the rest of his life.


  • 7 C.  (1933 - Scott #217) - "THE COMMISSION" - Sir Humphrey Gilbert receiving the royal patent for colonization from Queen Elizabeth I in 1578.
  • 8 C.  (1933 - Scott #218) - "FLEET LEAVING PLYMOUTH IN 1583" - Sir Humphrey Gilbert's five ships leaving Plymouth on June 11, 1583.

Sir Humphrey Gilbert's five ships were The Delight, The Ralegh (Raleigh), The Golden Hinde, The Swallow, and The Squirrel.  The fleet carried 260 settlers trained in the various fields necessary for the establishment of a colony, provisions, weapons, and sundry products to trade with the native Indians. 

The Ralegh (Raleigh) turned back during the voyage, and The Swallow was lost at sea.  The three remaining ships successfully continued on to their destination.


  • 9 C.  (1933 - Scott #219) - "ARRIVAL AT ST. JOHN'S".
  • 10 C.  (1933 - Scott #220) - "THE ANNEXATION, 5th AUG. 1583".


  • 14 C.  (1933 - Scott #221) - The Coat of Arms of England.
  • 15 C.  (1933 - Scott #222) - "WE ARE AS NEAR TO HEAVEN BY SEA AS BY LAND" - Sir Humphrey Gilbert on the deck of The Squirrel.

At the end of August 1583, Sir Humphrey Gilbert's remaining fleet departed Newfoundland, having not established a permanent colony, due to the lack of essential supplies. 

They followed the same course that Cabot had taken a hundred years earlier.  The Delight, which carried most of their supplies, ran aground near Sable Island and sank, with only sixteen surviving crew members.  The Squirrel, commanded by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, and The Golden Hinde continued on the voyage home. 

About 900 miles away from the Azores, they ran into a violent storm, and The Squirrel began sinking.  Gilbert refused to leave his sinking ship, and sitting on the deck, reading a book, he reportedly uttered the phrase, "We are as near to heaven by sea as by land".  Sir Humphrey Gilbert perished, along with his ship, on September 9, 1583.  The Golden Hinde was the only vessel, from Gilbert's original fleet, to safely return to England.


  • 20 C.  (1933 - Scott #223) - Captain John Mason's 1626 map of Newfoundland.


  • 24 C.  (1933 - Scott #224) - "QUEEN ELIZABETH".
  • 32 C.  (1933 - Scott #225) - "STATUE AT TRURO".




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Newfoundland Stamps - Issues of 1932-1937






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On February 9, 1933, the 15 C. denomination air mail stamps were overprinted "L. & S.. Post." for use on surface mail, as shown above.

The overprint stands for "Land and Sea Postage".


The four stamps shown above were issued on May 6, 1935 to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Reign of King George V

These stamps are all engraved, perforated 11 x 12, and they are printed on paper with WMK 4 - the Multiple Crown and Script CA watermark.


Each of the designs features a view of Windsor Castle and a left-facing profile of King George V with various types of coronation regalia integrated elsewhere in the design.