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Mexico Stamps

Definitives of 1864-1866


Definitive Mexico stamps, during the very brief period from 1864 to 1866, bear witness to the establishment of a European-backed monarchy in Mexico.

In 1858, Benito Juarez (1806-1872), of Zapotec descent, was elected as the President of Mexico.  Though very popular with most of the Mexican population, his ethnic origin and his liberal views were not acceptable to the conservative Spanish aristocracy of Mexico. 

A group of Mexican "monarchists" appealed to the crowned heads of Europe for assistance, and in January 1862, King Napoleon III of France ordered the invasion of Mexico.  Mexico City was taken in July 1863, and Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph of Austria was later designated as the Emperor of Mexico

The monarchy was never recognized as the legitimate government of Mexico by most of the international community.  Under increasing international pressure, the French withdrew their troops in February 1867, and afterwards, the monarchy quickly collapsed.



The eight definitive Mexico stamps shown above were issued beginning in 1864.  The stamps are engraved on white paper, and they are imperforate.

The common design features the Imperial Arms of Mexico (with the eagle wearing a crown).  On these stamps, as well as later definitive stamp issues, the name of the country has been changed from "Mejico" to "Mexico".

The stamps sent to the postal districts were overprinted, as before.  There are, however, five different overprint combinations for this series, which are as follows:

  1. District name only.
  2. District name, consignment number, and "1864" in large figures.
  3. District name, consignment number, and "1864" in small figures.
  4. District name, consignment number, and "1865".
  5. District name, consignment number, and "1866".

The Scott catalog attributes are as follows:

  • 03 C.  (1864 - Normal Paper - Sc. #18) - Brown.
  • 03 C.  (1864 - Laid Paper - Sc. #18b) - Brown.
  • 1/2 R.  (1864 - Sc. #19) - Brown.
  • 1/2 R.  (1864 - Sc. #20) - Lilac, Gray, Gray Lilac.
  • 01 R.  (1864 - Sc. #21) - Blue.
  • 01 R.  (1864 - Sc. #22) - Ultramarine.
  • 02 R.  (1864 - Sc. #23) - Orange.
  • 04 R.  (1864 - Sc. #24) - Green.
  • 04 R.  (1864 - Sc. #25) - Red.

Mint condition stamps without overprints, with only a couple rare exceptions, are remainders, and they have very little market value.

As with earlier classical Mexican definitive stamps, reprints and forgeries are abundant.



The five definitive Mexico stamps shown above were issued in 1866.  They are lithographed on white paper, and they are imperforate.

These lithographed printings have a "round period" after the value numerals.

The common design features a left-facing portrait of Emperor Maximilian I.

The Scott catalog attributes, for the lithographed printings, are as follows:

  • 07 C.  (1866 - Sc. #26) - Lilac Gray, Deep Gray.
  • 13 C.  (1866 - Sc. #27) - Blue, Cobalt Blue.
  • 25 C.  (1866 - Sc. #28) - Buff.
  • 25 C.  (1866 - Sc. #29) - Orange, Red Orange, Red Brown, Brown.
  • 50 C.  (1866 - Sc. #30) - Green.



The four Emperor Maximilian I definitive stamps shown above were also issued in 1866.  They are engraved on white paper, and they are also imperforate.

These engraved printings have a "square period" after the value numerals.

The Scott catalog attributes, for the engraved printings, are as follows:

  • 07 C.  (1866 - Sc. #31) - Lilac.
  • 13 C.  (1866 - Sc. #32) - Blue.
  • 25 C.  (1866 - Sc. #33) - Orange Brown.
  • 50 C.  (1866 - Sc. #34) - Green.

Mint condition Emperor Maximilian I stamps without overprints, with only a couple rare exceptions, are remainders, and they have very little market value.  The 50 C. denomination engraved stamp shown above is a good example.  In the 2016 Scott catalog, the mint stamp, with the overprint, catalogs $700.00.  The mint stamp, without the overprint (shown above), catalogs $2.50!





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Mexico Stamps

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Definitives of 1864-1866






SBI!




MEXICAN

EMPIRE


Emperor Maximilian I
of Mexico


Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph of the House of Hapsburg (1832-1867), the younger brother of Emperor Franz Josef I of Austria, became the Emperor of Mexico on April 10, 1864.

Emperor Maximilian I never really had a chance.  The government of the Republic of Mexico had not been overthrown.  It had simply fled into exile in Northern Mexico, where it would continue its fight against the monarchy. 

Having fought an 11 year war, earlier in the century, to gain their independence from Spain, the Mexican population would not tolerate being under the rule of a foreign monarch once again.  The new emperor tried making some liberal political concessions to the Mexican population, in the hope of gaining their favor, but his efforts were in vain.

Republican forces occupied Mexico City and captured the emperor on May 15, 1867.  The 34 year-old Emperor Maximilian I was later sentenced to death, and he was executed by firing-squad on June 19, 1867, after a reign of only three years.

His body was later returned to his family in Austria, and he is entombed in the Imperial Crypt in Vienna.