Custom Search


Austria Stamps

Issues of 1920-1922

Surtaxed German Austria stamps were introduced in 1920.  These surtaxed stamps, also known as semi-postal or charity stamps, were priced at double their face value, in addition to the denomination inscribed on the stamp.  Thus, a 20 Kroner postage stamp would cost the buyer 60 Kroner, a sizable sum of money, with 100 Kroner of just a few years earlier being a one ounce gold coin!  Unfortunately, most of the issues of this period were for political propaganda funds, instead of being for charitable funds.


On September 16, 1920, the current definitive postage stamps, or their types printed in differing colors, were overprinted "Kärnten Abstimmung" for the Carinthia Plebiscite.  They are all shown above.  The lower denominations were all perforated 12 1/2, and the higher denominations were all imperforate.

The Carinthian Plebiscite was held on October 10, 1920 in the Southern area settled by Carinthian Slovenes.  The plebiscite would determine the final border between the Republic of German Austria and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, which would eventually become Yugoslavia.  The population of the area, by a majority of 59%, voted for union with the Republic of German Austria.


On March 1, 1921, the current definitive postage stamps, or their types printed in differing colors, were overprinted "Hochwasser / 1920" for Flood Relief.  They are all shown above.  These German Austria stamps are all perforated 12 1/2.

The profits from the sale of these stamps went to a fund for the victims of serious flooding along the Danube River Basin that occurred during the Winter of 1920.


On May 29, 1921, the current definitive postage stamps were locally overprinted "Salzburger Volksabstimmung" (in various formats) for the Salzburg Peoples' Plebiscite.  Of the twenty denominations overprinted, thirteen of them are shown above.

The Salzurg Plebiscite was actually not an authorized plebiscite and the German Austria government in Vienna ordered that it be canceled.  This plebiscite was NOT about annexation to German Austria, but about annexation to the Republic of Germany!  The Allied nations, the League of Nations, and the Treaty of Versailles strictly forbade the unification of any part of German Austria with the Republic of Germany.  The people of Salzburg voted for unification with Germany, however the results were not recognized, and the union never happened.


On April 24, 1921, the current definitive postage stamps were locally overprinted with an Eagle and "24 Avril 1921" (in various formats) for the Tirol Peoples' Plebiscite.  All of them are shown above.

The Tirol Plebiscite was actually not an authorized plebiscite and the German Austria government in Vienna ordered that it be canceled.  This plebiscite was NOT about annexation to German Austria, but about annexation to the Republic of Germany!  The Allied nations, the League of Nations, and the Treaty of Versailles strictly forbade the unification of any part of German Austria with the Republic of Germany.  The results were not recognized, and the union never happened.




eBay Auction and Store Links

Austrian Empire, Republic of German
Austria, and the First Republic of Austria


The following links feature category-focused affiliated seller listings on various eBay sites worldwide. They may enable visitors to shop for and to buy specific items for the particular collecting subject they've just read about. 

The affiliated eBay seller auction lots provided by eBay, Inc. are not the responsibility of the management of this website.  On high priced material, make sure the lots you are buying are properly authenticated.

Remember that the lots on European eBay sites are priced in EUROS.  Shipping charges may be more, and the lots may take longer to arrive.  Also, make sure the foreign seller ships to your country, before bidding on or buying his lot.










Return to Austria Stamps of the First Republic
from Issues of 1920-1922






SBI!










During 1922, the current 2 K. denomination definitive stamps were overprinted "Flugpost", for use as air mail stamps.

Many of them were prepared, but they were never officially issued to post offices.  For an unissued stamp variety though, these are not particularly rare today.  Authenticated examples can be located on the internet for around $50 each.